Research

Rethink what you throw on the barbecue

Although the ballpark staple is a popular summer food, hot dogs are definitely not a favorite among health professionals, who take issue with the low nutrition levels of the food and how hot dogs are processed.

A typical pork hot dog contains 204 calories and 18 g of total fat and 620 g of sodium — and this is before condiments like ketchup, mustard and relish are added.

Furthermore, eating hot dogs increases your chances of getting certain diseases. Hot dogs, like many processed meats, are linked to increased risks for health issues like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and higher mortality.

An analysis of the diets of 1,660 people found that the risk for getting bladder cancer went up with the amount of processed meats consumed. And a 2015 study found that eating processed foods made for a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes than eating red meat.

Of particular concern among health experts and doctors are nitrates, preservatives added to hot dogs from synthetic materials or natural sources that give the meat longer shelf life and more color. When digested, nitrates turn into nitrites, which have been linked to cancer in test subject animals.... READ MORE AT TIME.COM

The Simple Reason Exercise Enhances Your Brain

Evidence keeps mounting that exercise is good for the brain. It can lower a person’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease and may even slow brain aging by about 10 years. Now, new research helps illuminate how, exactly, working out improves brain health.

In one research review published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers examined 39 studies that looked at the link between exercise and cognitive abilities among people over age 50. They found that aerobic exercise appears to improve a person’s cognitive function and resistance training can enhance a person’s executive function and memory. Other exercises like tai chi were also linked to improvements in cognition, though there wasn't as much available evidence. Ultimately, the researchers concluded that 45 minutes to an hour of moderate-to-vigorous exercise was good for the brain.

" There is now a wide body of research showing that the benefits to the body with exercise also exist for the brain," says study author Joe Northey, a PhD candidate at the University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise in Australia. " When older adults undertake aerobic or resistance exercise, we see changes to the structure and function of areas of the brain responsible for complex mental tasks and memory function."

But how does exercise have these effects? Another new study presented at the American Physiological Society's annual meeting in Chicago explored one possible way. In the study, researchers...More at Time.com

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